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​Nightclubs in Thailand can now reopen if they follow a whopping 22 rules

They include no dancing, social distancing & stopping alcohol sales at midnight

  • Olivia Wycech
  • 30 June 2020
​Nightclubs in Thailand can now reopen if they follow a whopping 22 rules

[Update]: Clubs have been given the green light to reopen on July 1 but in addition to the 22 rules laid out last week, venues must close at midnight since alcohol sales are not permitted after 12am.

It’s like dangling candy just out of the reach of a baby.

Earlier this week, a total of 22 regulations were unveiled as part of a draft submitted to the Centre for COVID-19 Situation Administration (CCSA) aimed at loosening lockdown restrictions. The fifth phase plan includes nightlife venues, which are expected to resume operations as early as next week after the CCSA promised to allow venues to reopen in July.

Open they might, but the proposed rules don’t leave much room for things like…dancing.

The rules appear to prohibit dancing to some degree, mingling and having more than a certain number of customers. Read the proposed iron-clad regulations for clubs that were hoping to reopen below:

• Controlling the number of patrons to ensure the venue does not get congested
• Checking every customer and staff member’s temperature
• Providing alcohol-based hand sanitising gel at all entrances and other areas as necessary
• Ensuring groups are no bigger than five
• Ensuring customers queuing to be seated maintain social distancing
• Ensuring all tables are at least 2 metres apart or are partitioned
• Ensuring seats are at least one metre apart
• Ensuring all venues are properly ventilated
• Only eating and drinking is allowed
• Beverages can only be served individually, and shared jugs or ice buckets are prohibited
• Serving staff are required to wear a mask or face shield at all times
• Stage or performance area must be partitioned, and audience must be at least 2 metres away from the stage
• Event comperes or speakers are required to wear a face shield at all times
• Patrons are not allowed to be loud or walk around the venue if not necessary
• If the sharing of food or beverages cannot be avoided, everyone at the table must be provided with an individual serving spoon or glass
• Toilets must be cleaned every 30 to 60 minutes
• All tables, chairs and frequently touched surfaces must be cleaned regularly
• No sports matches or competitions that will attract large groups of people are allowed
• No video gaming or pub games like pool and darts will be allowed
• Social distancing measures must be observed in smoking areas
• No service personnel or public relations representatives are allowed to sit with customers

We reached out to a popular Bangkok nightclub to see how it would be affected should the rules come into play. The owner, who asked not to be named, replied: “I honestly have no idea. If I only I knew what these knuckleheads have in mind.”

“Corruption still has a bright future in this country," they added.

Aside from nightclubs, the proposed regulations would also apply to pubs, bars, karaoke venues and…ahem…massage parlors. While nothing has been set in stone, details are expected to be confirmed this upcoming Friday.

According to the Bangkok Post, Thailand currently has an estimated 100,000 nightspots in the country, but only 20,000 are properly registered — the rest operate without licenses. It’s further estimated that some two million people are employed in the country’s entertainment and nightlife business.

Since the outbreak began, Thailand has recorded 3,151 cases and 58 deaths related to COVID-19 but has recorded no local infections in 27 days. The only new coronavirus infections were contracted overseas by Thais quarantined after returning from abroad. The borders to the country remained closed and are expected to remain closed to tourists for several more months. As of writing, only those with family in Thailand, business and some medical tourists are being considered.

[via Bangkok Post]

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